MeatsSim_2011

MeatsSim_2011 - Meats Meats Thelargestportionof$...

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    Meats
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     Meats The largest portion of $$  Crucial to determine: 1.  Quality of meat 2.  Needs 3.  Best storage and cooking  methods  
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    Composition of Meats Structure of Meat Meats are composed of a combination of: Water  Muscle  Connective tissue Adipose (fatty) tissue Bone The proportions of these elements vary according to  the animal and the part of its anatomy represented by  the cut of meat.
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    Muscle Structure A single muscle is composed of  many bundles of muscle cells or  fibers held together by connective  tissue. The tendons/ligaments attach  the muscle to the bone.   See diagram
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    Muscle Structure Bones
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    Muscle Tissue  1. Muscles - made up of muscle fibers.  muscle bundles - related to tenderness.   texture in meat.              Mammals – long  bundles of fibers  2. Fish – short fibers separated by thin  sheets 
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    Connective Tissue    Connective tissue serves a "connecting" function  in the body. Supports and binds other tissues.  Holds organs in place. Can be fibrous connective tissue - found in  tendons and ligaments. They act as the “glue” to  hold muscle cells together - mixture of proteins  and mucopolysaccharides.  Tenderness of meat relates to amt. of connective  tissues - also increases with age.                    
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    Collagen   - primary protein in connective tissue.   Shoulders and legs with more collagen are tougher.   Requires moist heat to hydrolyze/soften to gelatin.   High collagen content (exercised muscle, older  animals)  Moist heat slow cooking  Low collagen content (fish, less exercised muscle,  young animals)   Dry heat cookery                                  Elastin is a yellow rubbery part of the connective –  does not soften with heating. 
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    Marbling Marbling - Fat deposited in the muscle that can be seen as little 
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MeatsSim_2011 - Meats Meats Thelargestportionof$...

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