Writing_a_Thesis_Statement

Writing_a_Thesis_Statement - Eng 209 Writing a Thesis...

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Eng 209 Writing a Thesis Statement Every essay needs a thesis statement, whether it is stated directly or implied. Most teachers want to see your thesis statement in the first paragraph of your essays. The thesis statement declares the main point or controlling idea of your entire essay. It frequently answers the questions "What is the subject of this essay"; "What is the writer's opinion on this subject"; "What is the writer's purpose in this essay?" (for example, to explain something? to argue a position? to move people into action? to entertain?). When you are drafting your essay, use a "working thesis" to help you move from prewriting to drafting to revision. Everything in your essay should support your thesis. This does not mean that you are wedded to your thesis; as you write, you may discover that what you really want to write about is different from what you started with. Write a two part thesis One part should give the topic you are discussing and the other part should note your assertion about
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This note was uploaded on 09/09/2011 for the course ENG 209 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at S.F. State.

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Writing_a_Thesis_Statement - Eng 209 Writing a Thesis...

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