Chapter 23 Lecture

Chapter 23 Lecture - Light: Geometric Optics Units of...

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Light: Geometric Optics
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Units of Chapter 23 The Ray Model of Light Reflection; Image Formed by a Plane Mirror Formation of Images by Spherical Mirrors Index of Refraction Refraction: Snell’s Law
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Units of Chapter 23 Total Internal Reflection; Fiber Optics Thin Lenses; Ray Tracing The Thin Lens Equation; Magnification Combinations of Lenses Lensmaker’s Equation
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23.1 The Ray Model of Light Light very often travels in straight lines. We present light using rays, which are straight represent light using rays, which are straight lines emanating from an object. This is an idealization, but is very useful for geometric optics.
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23.2 Reflection; Image Formation by a Plane Mirror aw of reflection: the angle of reflection Law of reflection: the angle of reflection (that the ray makes with the normal to a surface) equals the angle of incidence. )q g
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23.2 Reflection; Image Formation by a Plane Mirror When light reflects from a rough surface, the law of reflection still holds, but the angle of incidence varies. This is called diffuse reflection.
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23.2 Reflection; Image Formation by a Plane Mirror ith diff se reflection o r e e sees With diffuse reflection, your eye sees reflected light at all angles. With specular flection (from a mirror) your eye must be in reflection (from a mirror), your eye must be in the correct position.
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23.2 Reflection; Image Formation by a Plane Mirror hat o see hen o look into a plane (flat) What you see when you look into a plane (flat) mirror is an image, which appears to be behind e mirror the mirror.
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23.2 Reflection; Image Formation by a Plane Mirror This is called a virtual and upright image, as e light does not go through it The distance the light does not go through it. The distance of the image from the mirror is equal to the distance of the object from the mirror.
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23.3 Formation of Images by Spherical Mirrors Spherical mirrors are shaped like sections of a sphere, and may be reflective on either the inside (concave) or outside (convex).
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23.3 Formation of Images by Spherical Mirrors Rays coming from a faraway object are effectively parallel.
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23.3 Formation of Images by Spherical Mirrors Parallel rays striking a spherical mirror do not all converge at exactly the same lace if the curvature place if the curvature of the mirror is large; this is called spherical aberration.
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23.3 Formation of Images by Spherical Mirrors thec r at reissmal l thefoc sism chmore If the curvature is small, the focus is much more precise; the focal point is where the rays onverge converge.
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23.3 Formation of Images by Spherical Mirrors sing geometry we find that the focal length is Using geometry, we find that the focal length is half the radius of curvature: (23-1) Spherical aberration can be avoided by sing a parabolic reflector; these are more using a parabolic reflector; these are more difficult and expensive to make, and so are used only when necessary, such as in research telescopes.
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23.3 Formation of Images by Spherical Mirrors e use ray diagrams to determine where an
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2011 for the course PHYS 1403 taught by Professor Glab during the Summer '08 term at Texas Tech.

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Chapter 23 Lecture - Light: Geometric Optics Units of...

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