Chapter 3 Motor Programs

Chapter 3 Motor Programs - Motor Control Chapter 5 Ski...

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Motor Control Chapter 5 Ski pole, rubber band task
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Motor Control Theory Describes and explains how the nervous system produces coordinated movement of motor skill in a variety of environments Two important terms: Coordination The degrees of freedom problem
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Coordination Patterning of body and limb motions relative to the patterning of environmental objects and events (Turvey, 1990) Two parts to consider: Relationship among head, body, &/or limbs at a specific point in time during skill performance E.g. angle-angle diagrams Context of the environment constrain the head, body, &/or limb movements to act in a way so the goal of the action can be accomplished
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Degrees of Freedom Problem Degrees of freedom (df) = Number of independent elements in a system and the ways each element can act Degrees of freedom problem = How to control the df to make a complex system act in a specific way – e.g. The control of a helicopter’s flight (described in the textbook) Limit the df combinations Degree of freedom problem for the control of movement: How does the nervous system control the many df of muscles, limbs, and joints to enable a person to perform an action as intended?
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Closed-loop control system E.g. air conditioner E.g. steering a car Max. # of corrections/sec.? How can you make 5 corrections/sec.?
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Open-Loop Control Executive Effector No comparator or feedback Quick No error detection No modifications during movement Example: Traffic light control, simple computer program
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2011 for the course ESS 3303 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '08 term at Texas Tech.

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Chapter 3 Motor Programs - Motor Control Chapter 5 Ski...

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