Chapter 5 Stages of Learning

Chapter 5 Stages of Learning - Stages of Learning Chapter 5...

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Stages of Learning Chapter 5
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Introduction People progress through distinct stages (phases) as they learn a motor skill i.e, as they progress from being a beginner to being highly skilled Two models proposed to identify and describe the stages: Fitts and Posner three-stage model Gentile two-stage model
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The Fitts and Posner Three Stage Model Fitts and Posner (1967) proposed motor skill learning involved three stages Cognitive stage: Beginner focuses on solving cognitively-oriented problems. Attention: Associative stage: Person has learned to associate cues from the environment with required movements ; works to refine performance to be more consistent. Attention: Autonomous stage: Final stage where performance of the skill is “automatic” ( S1 R1 production unit ) Attention:
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Stages of Learning Stiff-looking Many and Large errors Slow and Timid Inefficient Indecisive Attention Demanding Cognitive Associative Autonomous More Relaxed More Accurate More Consistent More Fluid More confident More efficient Fewer errors Automatic Accurate Consistent Fluid Confident Adaptable Recognizes & corrects errors
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Gentile’s Two Stage Model Gentile (1972, 1987, 2000) proposed motor skill learning progress through two stages: 1. Initial stage Learner works to achieve two goals: 1) Movement coordination pattern to enable some degree of success achieving action goal relation to degrees of freedom? 2) Learn to discriminate between regulatory and non- regulatory conditions in environmental context Regulatory conditions : characteristics of the environmental context that determines the movement characteristics the person must use to achieve an action goal e.g. pin position, lane conditions Non-regulatory conditions: e.g. crowd noise, score
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Gentile’s Two Stage Model, cont’d 2. Later stages Involves learner acquiring three characteristics: 1) Adapting movement pattern acquired in Initial stage to demands of any performance situation 2) Increase consistency of action goal achievement 3) Perform with an economy of effort
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Chapter 5 Stages of Learning - Stages of Learning Chapter 5...

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