Euthyphro - Euthyphro In Plato's work, Euthyphro, which is...

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Euthyphro In Plato’s work, Euthyphro, which is a conversation between Socrates and Euthyphro, Socrates questions Euthyphro on what piety means. Euthyphro answers this question in four different ways throughout the conversation, but the second claim has many interesting aspects in ancient Greek culture. Euthyphro states in this claim, “Well, then, what is pleasing to the gods is pious, and what is not pleasing to them is impious.”(Plato 12) Socrates gives Euthyphro a chance to explain his position, but Socrates reminds Euthyphro that there are many disagreements between the Gods, and each God may find different things to be pleasing or honorable.(Plato 13) Socrates then asks Euthyphro that if the Gods quarrel about whether something is just or not, then don’t the Gods hate something and love it at the same time? Socrates uses this point to show Euthyphro that the same thing may be pious and impious at the same time, depending on which God was assessing the action.(Plato 13) Even though the Gods all hold that the
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Euthyphro - Euthyphro In Plato's work, Euthyphro, which is...

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