Lecture%2014%20-%20Chapter%2014

Lecture%2014%20-%20Chapter%2014 - Chapter 14 History of...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 14 History of Education in U.S. Before the Civil War, most people were illiterate Early political leaders like Thomas Jefferson argued that literacy was vital to the U.S. if it was to become a political democracy. At the time, the U.S. was both rural and poor and most people were illiterate Illiteracy wasnt a big problem though because not everyone needed to be educated Women didnt need to be educated because they belonged in the home African Americans, who were mostly slaves at the time, werent allowed to go to school for fear that literacy would encourage rebellion After the Civil War, when slavery was abolished, schools allowed in African Americans, but schools were both separate and unequal History of Education in the U.S. In the late 1800s, during the Industrial Revolution, illiteracy became a widely defined problem As machinery in factories became more complex, schooling got extended to include basic skills like reading, writing and arithmetic Also, to accommodate the influx of immigrants in the country, cultural lessons were offered to teach English and to Americanize them Many immigrants resisted change and did not want to send their children to public schools Catholics responded by creating parochial schools to send their children to instead of public schools By 1918 every state had enacted a mandatory education law requiring children attend school until age 16 or the completion of the 8th grade Since then, the extent of schooling has increased steadily In U.S. history, education has undergone dramatic change. Before it wasnt really a major issue if people were illiterate. Today, we now expect young people to attend school Education is Functional! Functionalists argue that having an education system is functional for society. Indeed, education must be important because all known societies have some form of education system. Education is functional because it accomplishes three main things within a society. First, education fulfills socialization purposes. Education teaches the young about their cultural heritage, including ethics, values, political beliefs, habits, and norms essentially, education teaches the young culture, thus socializing them into their society. Cultural transmission of values! Second, education teaches people how to perform certain occupations. In less developed societies, parents might educate their children on how to do a certain type of work, and in industrialized countries, formal education trains people to do various kinds of work. Knowledge and skills!! A third function of education is actually a latent function. Education contributes to social control, the regulation of deviant behavior. By making education compulsory, young people are in school instead of on the streets getting into trouble....
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Lecture%2014%20-%20Chapter%2014 - Chapter 14 History of...

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