FinalExamReview

FinalExamReview - ME 200: Thermodynamics I Division 1:...

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ME 200: Thermodynamics I ivision 1: Spring 2011 Division 1: Spring 2011 Final Exam Review
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Final Exam When? Monday, May 2, 2011 What time? 1:00 to 3:00 pm Where? All Divisions in Lambert Fieldhouse Closed book and closed notes Equation sheet and unit conversion will be provided Property tables will be provided Final exam is comprehensive
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For Final Exam eview xtbook, lecture notes/solved examples, quizzes, Review textbook, lecture notes/solved examples, quizzes, and assigned homework (textbook problems and SP) Bring calculator with fresh batteries, pencils, eraser Do not study all night before examination . Get enough sleep on the night before (not during the day and definitely not during 1:00 to 3:00 pm). Eat good lunch before coming to the exam Do not stress yourself over this exam
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During Final Exam Read each problem carefully and be sure to answer what is being asked. When in doubt, seek clarification ! Show all work neatly to maximize your score Write basic equations and assumptions Budget your time wisely . First solve problems which boost your confidence. Do not spend time when you get stuck – come back to it after you have maximized your score Hand in the exam when time is over . Do not force your instructor to wrestle you to the floor to get your exam
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What is Thermodynamics? Application of three governing principles to individual components or systems under consideration » Mass Balance » Energy Balance » Entropy Balance ystem is the region of interest System is the region of interest Surroundings is everything outside that region of interest
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Types of System olated systems have neither mass nor energy interactions Isolated systems have neither mass nor energy interactions with the surroundings losed systems (also called control mass) have energy Closed systems (also called control mass) have energy interactions (heat and work) but no mass interactions with the surroundings Open systems (also called control volume) have energy interactions (heat and work) as well as mass interactions with the surroundings
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Property, State, and Process Property is a particular characteristic of a given system » Extensive properties do not remain the same if the system were divided into many smaller systems e.g. mass, total volume, total energy » Intensive properties remain the same even if the system ere divided into many smaller systems were divided into many smaller systems e.g. temperature, density, specific energy » Specific properties are extensive properties per unit mass and indicated by lower case letters State is defined using a set of properties Process occurs when state changes due to energy/mass interactions between system and surroundings
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Some Properties bsolute Pressure P ( f n r Pa) Absolute Pressure P (lbf/in 2 or Pa) Absolute Temperature T (R or K) pecific Volume v (ft m r m g) Specific Volume v (ft 3 /lbm or m 3 /kg) Specific Internal Energy u (Btu/lbm or kJ/kg) Specific Enthalpy h = u + Pv (Btu/lbmor
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FinalExamReview - ME 200: Thermodynamics I Division 1:...

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