Lecture 9e - Module 1 iClicker Questions re Fritz the Cat

Lecture 9e Module - from primping and feeding Fritz’s numerous siblings Is this a valid question for scientific psychology a yes b no 5 A

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Lecture 9e Module 1 1. A psychologist working in neuroscience might consider Fritz’s sudden reactions to loud noises and rapidly approaching toddlers, and speculate on the effects of the lack of a frontal lobe in the brains of cats. Is this a valid question for scientific psychology? a. yes b. no 2. An evolutionary psychologist might wonder about how and why Fritz’s random jumpy behavior was passed on to him and to other house cats, despite countless generations of life with humans. Is this a valid question for scientific psychology? a. yes b. no 3. A behavioral geneticist might wonder what effect either environment or genetic inheritance has had on Fritz’s intelligence, personality, sexual orientation, and vulnerability to depression. Is this a valid question for scientific psychology? a. yes b. no 4. A psychoanalyst might ask whether Fritz’s constant pleas for petting, hugging and food, have their origin in the sexual and aggressive frustrations Fritz suffered as a kitten, the runt of the litter, often pushed aside by his mother after she had tired
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Unformatted text preview: from primping and feeding Fritz’s numerous siblings. Is this a valid question for scientific psychology? a. yes b. no 5. A cognitive psychologist might wonder what Fritz notices and what he doesn’t, how he associates one cue with another, how much or how little he may remember of specific episodes, and how this influences his moods. Is this a valid question for scientific psychology? a. yes b. no 6. The “hard sciences” (chemistry, physics, and so on) aspire to be “objective,” “rational” and “value-free”; their goal is to be accurate, and to provide “the right answer.” – Suppose that Fritz were to fall ill from some terrible terminal disease. If all of these representatives of schools of thought in psychology were to be called in by Fritz’s vet and if they were asked to advise whether Fritz should live or die, could scientific psychology give “the right answer”? Would that be a valid question for scientific psychology? a. yes b. no...
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2011 for the course PSCH 100 taught by Professor Rosanova during the Fall '08 term at Ill. Chicago.

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