2154 Session 9 %26 10 Ch 6 Spring2010

2154 Session 9 %26 10 Ch 6 Spring2010 - An Overview of...

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An Overview of Social Work and Social Welfare History Shari E. Miller, PhD Chapter 6
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Early Approaches to Social Welfare Ancient Traditions and Practices Feudalism’s exchange: Gentry provided protection to the serfs who worked land Middle Ages: rise in care for the aged, disabled, orphaned, poor, sick; Bubonic Plague & Statute of Laborers (1349) The Church as a primary caregiver until the 16 th century Reformation
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The Elizabethan Poor Law of 1601 First legislation to provide public support for needy via local taxes Created categories of eligible recipients Dependent Children Placed in service based on bidding system Impotent Poor Indoor relief Outdoor relief Able-bodied Poor “Undeserving”
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Additional Social Welfare Acts Law of Settlement, 1662 Residency requirement Speenhamland System, 1795 Income supplement so all poor people would have “survival income.” Failed -- wages fell/unemployment soared (no work incentives) English Poor Law Reforms, 1834 Reduced outdoor relief & brought back workhouses as only place where able- bodied were helped
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Ideological Consequences of 1834 Reforms Public attitudes toward poor became hostile and resentful Public blamed poor for their poverty Concept of being less eligible: benefits should be lower than what poorest working people could earn People receiving public assistance always poorer than the poorest worker
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Social Welfare in US from Colonial Period Until Mid-1800s Attitudes and laws toward poor similar to those in England Poor people part of social order and community Residency requirements; Communities defined worthy/unworthy poor Poor were pitied; Dependent children placed in local apprenticeships By 1820s and 30s people beginning to view poverty as social problem
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Mental Health & Mental Illness Colonists cared for people w/MI (“lunatics”) at home or boarded with “foster family” Major mental health movements in US Moral treatment 1770s-1900 Humane treatment in institutional settings Mental Hygiene 1900-1945 Specialized psych units and psychotherapy Deinstitutionalization 1950s to present Provision of care in people’s own communities
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Dorothea Dix: MH Advocate 19 th century advocate for those w/MI Volunteered to teach Sunday School at women’s prison in 1840s Appalled by treatment of MI people there Publicized deplorable conditions of care 30 state mental hospitals were created Dubious premises State facilities for MI cost effective MIs curable
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Native Americans: Treaties and Control Treaties defined legal and political relationships between Federal Gov’t and various nations 1781 Articles of Confederation: gov’t sole, exclusive authority over Indian affairs Bureau of Indian Affairs, 1824 Attempt to address issues with American
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2154 Session 9 %26 10 Ch 6 Spring2010 - An Overview of...

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