Math119MontyHallAnalysis

Math119MontyHallAnalysis - of wins x P x Relative...

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MONTY HALL ANALYSIS In five of my statistics classes, 101 pairs (or teams) of students each played 18 rounds of the Monty Hall game. If X represents the number of “wins” among the 18 rounds played under the “switching strategy,” then X ± Bin n = 18, p = 2 3 ± ² ³ ´ µ . Let’s compare the theoretical binomial probabilities for the possible numbers of wins with the relative frequencies that we obtained for our 101 teams. Note : I wish that we had many more than 101 teams; then, the correspondences may have been more impressive!
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Unformatted text preview: # of wins, x P x ( ) Relative frequencies Frequencies 0 0+ 0 0 1 0+ 0 0 2 0+ 0 0 3 0+ 0 0 4 0+ 0 0 5 .001 0 0 6 .003 0 0 7 .011 .010 1 8 .029 .079 8 9 .064 .079 8 10 .116 .129 13 11 .168 .188 19 12 .196 .149 15 13 .181 .149 15 14 .129 .109 11 15 .069 .089 9 16 .026 .020 2 17 .006 0 0 18 .001 0 0 In Section 11-2, we will discuss goodness-of-fit tests that will allow us to test the viability of the binomial distribution above as a “feasible match” for the observed relative frequencies....
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2011 for the course MATH 119 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at Mesa CC.

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