Trolley Fieldtrip

Trolley Fieldtrip - DISCOVERING THE URBAN PHYSICAL...

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DISCOVERING THE URBAN - PHYSICAL LANDSCAPE USING PUBLIC TRANSIT **Don’t forget to attach your transit passes and a picture of you at three or more stations. Name____________________________________ San Diego Trolley Field Trip Stop 1: City College From this vantage, we can see the San Diego Bay to the west of the College, with the urban landscape predominating. At this location, the natural systems are now paved and planned landscapes and hardscapes. The original ecosystem would have been sand and salt flats, salt marshes, and grassland. From the south end of San Diego Bay, across and through Downtown San Diego is the Rose Canyon fault, which runs north to Torrey Pines, north of La Jolla. Although this fault is rarely active, it is part of the Pacific Plate, which is skidding north along the North American Plate. ▪When proceeding through the City of San Diego, what visual cues do you see in the landscape to alert you of changing neighborhoods? ▪The Santa Fe Station serves not only the trolley, but also Amtrak and the Coaster trains. How has increased mass transit changed the way San Diegans commute? ▪When proceeding toward Old Town, how does the pattern of development change? Stop 2: Old Town Old Town was the original “downtown” San Diego. 1
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Although difficult to see in the photographs, this was a major town with surrounding agricultural interests, water resources, and cultural centers. The Presidio and the Mission de Alcala were nearby as well. This area is now a State Park. You will be walking through to the park and visiting a few of the exhibits. When you cross the street into the park, turn left toward the McCoy house to see the gardens for the questions on this part of the worksheet. ▪Old Town Garden: What type of plants would have grown here before the settlers came? ▪When was San Diego settled by the La Jollan complex of people? The Kumeyaay? The European Settlers? How were their settlements different? ▪What kinds of plants were valued in the kitchen garden of the early European Settlers? What kinds of plants are currently growing here? ▪The trees are unique in this area. What dominates the landscape? What would have been here 150 years ago? Why? ▪What weather patterns would have influenced the choices of the early European settlers as well as proximity to what resources? 2
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Stop 3: Mission Valley This area was once open farmland that included dairies and rice fields. There were seasonal flood episodes that kept the land fertile. There are now 2 dams on this river that give us both water storage and protection from seasonal flooding. Lake Murray and Lindo Lake are also resources for recreation and wild bird migrations. Along the San Diego River is also one of the largest urban parks in the country, Mission Trails Regional Park.
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This note was uploaded on 09/09/2011 for the course GEOG 51433 taught by Professor Stutz during the Spring '11 term at Mesa CC.

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Trolley Fieldtrip - DISCOVERING THE URBAN PHYSICAL...

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