Lecture08-Notes - ME 382 Lecture 08 STRUCTURES OF SOLUTIONS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ME 382 Lecture 08 1 S TRUCTURES OF SOLUTIONS AND COMPOUNDS Few elements used in pure state (usually alloyed) E.g. Steel (Fe & C), 2xxx Al (Al +4%Cu+Mg, Si, Mn) Titanium (Ti-6%Al-4%V) Brass (Cu = 20% Zn) Bronze (Cu + 10-30%Sn) Solid solutions Alloy element (or ‘solute’) “dissolves” in ‘solvent’ element Wide range of solubilities (<0.01% to 100%) Fe can only dissolve 0.007 wt% C Sn can dissolve only 0.3 wt% Pb at room temperature 2.5wt% at 183 ° C Pb can dissolve 2wt% Sn at room temperature 19wt% at 183 ° C Cu and Ni are completely soluble in each other Two ways for atoms to dissolve: Interstitial solid solutions (if solute has small atoms such as C, B, N) E.g. , C in Fe Substitutional solid solutions E.g., Cu Sn If there is an excess of alloying element - a precipitate is formed E.g. , sugar in water, or moisture in air) The precipitates may be a saturated solid solution of host in alloy element E.g. Dissolve more than 2% Sn in Pb at room temperature Excess precipitates out as Sn with 0.3% Pb dissolved in it Precipitate may be a chemical compound E.g. Fe 3 C in steels; CuAl 2 in Al/Cu systems
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 5

Lecture08-Notes - ME 382 Lecture 08 STRUCTURES OF SOLUTIONS...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online