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Exam2 - FC_Book Notes3 - The flashcards are formatted for...

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Business Strategy Business and Corporate Strategy
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Two types of strategy: Charts the course for a firm’s activities in individual industries.
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Synergy Corporate Strategy
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Addresses the composition of a firm’s portfolio of business units. Combining different but related businesses could create value.
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Horizontal Strategy Horizontal Strategy
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A coordinated set of goals and policies across distinct but interrelated business units; how diversified firms enhance the competitive advantage of business units. Provides for explicit coordination among business units that makes corporate or group strategy more than the sum of the individual business unit strategies.
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Technology Horizontal Strategy
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The essence of corporate strategy; would fail without organizational mechanisms to facilitate interrelationships that work in tandem with a decentralized corporate Breaking down barriers between industries and driving them together while reducing costs of exploiting the interrelationships; making it possible to share activities across business unit lines
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organizational structure. where it was not feasible previously.
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Tangible Interrelationshi ps Multipoint Competitors
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Firms that compete with each other not only in one business unit, but in a number of related business units. Arise from opportunities to share activities in the value chain among related business units due to the presence of common buyers, channels, technologies, and other factors.
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Tangible Interrelationshi p Intangible Interrelationshi ps
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Involve the transference of management know- how among separate value chains; even if you can’t share activities, you can be similar in generic terms, such as in the type of buyer, type of purchase Lead to competitive advantage if sharing lowers cost or enhance differentiation enough to enhance the costs of sharing.
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by the power, type of manufacturing process, etc.
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Tangible, Intangible, and Competitor Interrelationshi ps Intangible Interrelationships
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Lead to competitive advantage through transference of generic skills or know-how about how to manage a particular type of activity from one business to another. Three broad types of interrelationships among business units:
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Competitor Interrelationshi ps Competitor Interrelationships
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Stems from the existence of rivals that actually or potentially compete with a firm in more than one industry; make tangible and intangible interrelationships all the more important to Multipoint competitors that link industries together because actions toward them in one industry may have implications in another.
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recognize and exploit.
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