Exam1 - FC1

Exam1 - FC1 - The flashcards are formatted for printing....

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Exit; Loyalty; Voice Negotiations
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The primary form of “voice.” ____ corresponds with avoidance and ____ with lumping it; ____ is most likely to be realized in interests-based procedures such as problem-solving negotiation and mediation
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Exit-Voice Continuum Hirschman
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Theorist, economist, and financial consultant/advisor that created the exit, voice, and loyalty theory. Responses to decline in firms, organizations, and states; loyalty an intervening factor.
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Rights or Power Power-Based Approach
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The most costly approach to resolving disputes. Determining them has the tendency to encourage adversarial perspectives when resolving disputes.
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Distressed; Effective Interests
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Reconciling them creates a higher level of mutual satisfaction when resolving disputes; underlying problems and concerns are identified; fosters esprit de corps. ____ systems focus more on power and ____ systems focus more on interests
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Accommodating Strategy Interest-Based Approach
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Usually narrowly defined to accommodate a smaller group, thus lacking universality; neglects greater preponderance of benefit, possibly overlooking rights of High importance of relationships and low importance of outcomes (lose to win).
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majority; prioritization is often subjective judgment and negotiations-based.
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Avoiding Strategy Collaborative Strategy
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High importance of relationships and outcomes (win-win). Low importance of relationships and outcomes (lose-lose).
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Compromise Strategy Competitive Strategy
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Low importance of relationships and high importance of outcomes (win-lose). Average importance of relationships and outcomes (split the difference).
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Collaborative Strategy Competitive Strategy
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The outcome is the most important in negotiation, considered a one-time stand for an unimportant relationship with defensive posturing; critical factors include a well-defined Relationships and outcomes are equally important; criteria include understanding your counterpart’s needs and objectives, a free flow of information, and a joint effort to find the best solution.
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bargaining range, good alternative, and tactics.
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Alex cuts her wrists Compromising Strategy
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Satisficing rather than maximizing goals; default alternative when the collaborative strategy is not possible and critical resources exclude collaboration; some gain on both outcome and 1 st Major Plot Point in Fatal Attraction.
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relationship dimensions.
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1. Style supersedes substance 2. Start negotiations amicably 3. Use investment 1. Negotiating is a game 2. Negotiating is interactive 3. Negotiating is a process
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principle
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Three core concepts of negotiation: Three-part framework of the negotiating success:
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Self-Centrism Self-Centrism
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Biggest pitfall in negotiation is thinking it’s all about you. Inflexible goal
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Exam1 - FC1 - The flashcards are formatted for printing....

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