Exam2 - FC2 - The flashcards are formatted for printing....

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Positioning Positioning
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Defining relationships in negotiations; manner in which negotiators establish presence and authority in a specific context. Includes offense, defense, one- upsmanship (men), and one-downsmanship (women).
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Reactive Counter Strategic Moves
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Actions negotiators take to relatively position themselves and others in the negotiation process; used to place the counterpart on the defensive or fortify their own position; put Respondent remains on the defensive, tending to reinforce the previous move; we move, so they counter.
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themselves in a better position to get what they want.
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Strategic Moves, Reactive Countermove, Turns Turns
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Actions taken to restore parity to positioning; ensures equity. Shadow negotiation actions:
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Participative Turns Restorative Turns
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Means to create or restore equity in the process; naming and corrective turns are most likely to reestablish the balance of power (get back to balance). Intended to engage the other party; acknowledge the problem, but indicate that a solution is possible.
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Restorative and Participative Turns Participative Turns
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Tend to give the perpetrator a “way out” of the move statement; a solution is possible, so help them save face (i.e. “I don’t think you meant take-it-or-leave- it; what you meant was we should continue our Turn categories:
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discussion.”)
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1. Condescending chivalry 2. Supportive discouragement 3. Radiant devaluation 4. Considerate domination 5. Collegial exclusion Delegitimation
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Attempt to put the negotiator on the defensive and weaken their relative negotiation power (i.e. exploitation, friendly harassment). Position undercutting:
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Supportive Discouragemen t Condescending Chivalry
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i.e. bus driver makes a man give up his seat for a woman, which makes her seem weak Send a mixed message about a woman’s ability (i.e. promoting an attractive woman that’s just an average worker).
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Considerate Domination Radiant Devaluation
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woman (i.e. “You’re too cute to be a director”). i.e. a man insists he’ll
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Exam2 - FC2 - The flashcards are formatted for printing....

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