Classification Drug Resistant TB

Classification Drug Resistant TB - Classification Drug...

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Classification Drug Resistant TB Running Head: CLASSIFICATION DRUG RESISTANT TB Classification Drug Resistant TB 1
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Classification Drug Resistant TB Classification Drug Resistant TB Introduction Tuberculosis is an airborne contagious disease caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. It should be noted that it is only the individuals who are sick with it in their lungs who are infectious. It is transmitted in the incidence of an infected person sneezing, coughing, talking or spitting. The TB bacilli germs are propelled into the air. For another person to be infected, they inhale a small amount of the bacilli (WHO, 2010). It has been documented that an infected person has the likelihood of infecting 10 to 15 people in the event they stay untreated. However, not all infected persons with TB bacilli show sickness from the disease. This is because the individual’s immune system walls off the infection. It is only when the immune system is at risk, for instance from an underlying medical problem, that the chances of becoming sick get heightened. TB has been seen to have the capacity to affect any organ; however, it mostly occurs in the lung (70% - 80%). The most common symptoms presented by TB include prolonged cough, fever, weight loss, night sweats, hemoptysis, and anorexia. Extra pulmonary infections of TB include pleuritis, bone and joint disease, genitourinary disease, meningitis and lymphadenitis. Statistically speaking, about a third of the global population is TB infected. It is further documented that 5-10% of non- HIV individuals infected with TB become sick or pose the possibility to become infectious during their lifetime. Further still, those ailing from HIV are at a much greater risk to develop TB. According to WHO estimates, in 2008, the largest number of new TB infection cases was recorded in South East Asia region, 35% of the world’s TB cases. It is however 2
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Classification Drug Resistant TB surprising that the incidence rate recorded in Sub-Saharan Africa was twice that the figure in South East Asian Region. It was further recorded that an estimate of 1.7 million people died in 2009 from TB. Of the regions with the highest mortality rate, Africa region was leading. WHO have recorded that the number of new cases that come up annually is on the rise in Africa, Eastern Mediterranean and South East- Asia. Statement of the problem It is however tragic that TB forms lethal combinations with some disease conditions that may either shorten the lifespan of an infected person or make it difficult for its treatment. One of such combinations is HIV and TB (WHO, 2010).They both speed up each other’s progress in the body. As HIV weakens the immunity of the individual, TB multiplies itself to cause faster onset of sickness to the patient. With that said, TB has been noted to be the leading cause of death in HIV positive infected individuals. In addition, HIV leads in the rise of TB incidences. The other dangerous form of TB is the Drug-resistant TB. It has been documented
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Classification Drug Resistant TB - Classification Drug...

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