WeatheronthetopoftheGeographyBuilding

- AND SO Relative humidity went DOWN 5(Why Because the temperature went up which also means that saturation vapor pressure went up too Relative

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Weather on the top of the Geography  Building  on 2/4/09 at: 1 pm vs. 4 pm From 1 pm to 4 pm, the following happened: Temperature went UP (remember, warmest temps are at mid-afternoon… notice that the high temperature occurred at 3:52 pm) Dew point stayed about the same (i.e., absolute amount of water vapor constant) Vapor pressure stayed the same (i.e., absolute amount of water vapor constant)
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Unformatted text preview: AND SO Relative humidity went DOWN 5% (Why? Because the temperature went up, which also means that saturation vapor pressure went up, too. Relative humidity is the ratio of vapor pressure divided by saturation vapor pressure—so, since saturation vapor pressure went up, the overall ratio went down!) Also: notice the clouds in the photograph at 4 pm, but not at 1 pm. More on that soon!...
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This note was uploaded on 09/09/2011 for the course GEOG 1112 taught by Professor Frye during the Spring '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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- AND SO Relative humidity went DOWN 5(Why Because the temperature went up which also means that saturation vapor pressure went up too Relative

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