Bignell Final Paper - Running head: THE EVERGLADES NATIONAL...

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Running head: THE EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK 1 The Everglades National Park Tracy Lynn Bignell SCI230 January 9, 2011 Carleitta Paige
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THE EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK 2 The Everglades National Park The Everglades is the largest designated wilderness east of the Rocky Mountains within the United States. A wide variety of lives are found within the Everglades. All forms of life are in danger in the everglades, from the different forms of habitat to the animals, Endangered, or not. The park boundaries have increased from 460,000 acres to 1,509,533 acres. In December 1947 President Harry S. Truman formally dedicated the Everglades National Park. “Although, this park was set aside to protect the valuable culture and biological resources the Everglades still face many issues that impact its very survival as an intact ecosystem” (Everglades Conservation, unknown). The goal of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) is to restore and preserve habitats of south Florida and the Everglades while controlling floods, and managing water supplies. The CERP will cost about Seven Billion Dollars and will take approximately 20 years to develop. It will take the United States Army Corp of engineers, south Florida Water Management District, along with other agencies, and citizens, working together to make this plan successful (Everglades Conservation, unknown). The Florida Splash Pines and the Cabbage Palms are found within the pine lands in the prairies in the Fresh water marshes. Both of these trees are fighting for their existence. The Florida Splash pines harvested for their sap, for the manufacturing of turpentine; railroad ties, fuel, and lumber (unknown, 2006). “The Florida slash pine is a fire-tolerant species with multi- layered bark, long needles that protect vulnerable buds, and seedlings with thick fire-resistant stems” (Unknown). The Cabbage palm is also fire resistant, and thrives under poor soil conditions. The Hardwood Hammocks are also within the Fresh Water Marshes. They provide habitat for many threatened and endangered species, like the Silver Thatch Pine, Capania, and the Tree Cactus.
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THE EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK 3 Saw Grass Marshes filled with Saw grass, not a true grass, but a member of the sedge Family (Everglades Conservation, unknown). Saw Grass characterized by its sharp teeth along
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This note was uploaded on 09/09/2011 for the course FINAL SCI230 taught by Professor Paige during the Winter '11 term at University of Phoenix.

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Bignell Final Paper - Running head: THE EVERGLADES NATIONAL...

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