Final Project 1.3 v2 (AM Radio Transmitter and Receiver EE100)

Final Project 1.3 v2 (AM Radio Transmitter and Receiver EE100)

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Final Project EE100 Summer 2011 T. Dear, J. Lin, V. Lee 1 Amplitude Modulation FINAL PROJECT ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 100 ELECTRONIC TECHNIQUES FOR ENGINEERING University of California, Berkeley Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Brian Gawalt, Tony Dear, Jonathan Lin, Vincent Lee Lab Contents: I. Background to the Project a. Some Background to Amplitude Modulation II. Introduction III. Project Specifications a. Design Specifications b. Performance Specifications IV. Design Phase a. Signal Preparation and Modulation i. The Input Modulation Stage ii. The Pre-Amplifier Stage b. Demodulation and Signal Recovery i. Amplifier Stage ii. Demodulation Stage iii. Filter Stage and Signal Recovery c. Putting It All Together V. Prototyping Phase a. Testing Tips b. Project Check-Off VI. Analysis Questions VII. Lab Submissions a. Concluding Remarks b. Image Citations NAME: SID: NAME: SID: SCORE: ________/100 X 2.5 = ________/250 Final Project EE100 Summer 2011 T. Dear, J. Lin, V. Lee 2 Background to the Project In communication systems, we often want to transmit a signal which contains data, and be able to receive and interpret that data. In some applications, it is sufficient to simply wire a transmitter and receiver together, but that places limits on the range of the system. In addition, we may want to transmit the data to multiple nodes on a network such as a radio. Since radios are usually mobile devices, wiring every radio to the transmitter doesn’t make any sense. The solution is to transmit and receive the data wirelessly. This solution allows for a transmitter to reach multiple receivers without a physical connection. But this presents another problem. What if we want to have multiple transmitters? We can’t just simultaneously transmit everything at the same time and hope that you can hear something. That’s the equivalent of trying to listen to the professor from the back row while everyone in the lecture room is talking. Fortunately, over the years, systems engineers, signal processing experts, and mathematicians have ironed out the details as to how to solve this problem with a technique called modulation. Modulation is a process that prepares a data signal for transmission over the network. Essentially what modulation does is it alters the signal in a particular way before transmitting it. The only way to recover the original signal by the receiver is if we demodulate the signal correctly. Therefore, modulation and demodulation are similar to encryption and decryption for signals. Below is a rough idea of how the modulation and demodulation scheme works. There are several different types of modulation but for this project we will stick with amplitude modulation. Yes, this is the same type of modulation that your AM radio stations use....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 09/09/2011 for the course EECS 40 taught by Professor Chang-hasnain during the Summer '08 term at Berkeley.

Page1 / 16

Final Project 1.3 v2 (AM Radio Transmitter and Receiver EE100)

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online