The Call for a New Diagnosis - Addictive Disorders

The Call for a New Diagnosis - Addictive Disorders - 110 J...

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Unformatted text preview: 110 J ournal of A ddictions & O ffender C ounseling • April 2009 • Volume 29 © 2009 by the American Counseling Association. All rights reserved. The Call for a New Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Diagnosis: Addictive Disorders W. Bryce Hagedorn [40 WORDS INSERTED FOR SPACE] Process addictions affect individuals, fami- lies, and society in powerful ways. Without a consensually validated definition and a set of diagnostic criteria, counselors lack the necessary assessment and treatment tools. This article presents the position of the International Association of Addictions . . . For the estimated 22.6 million individuals who abuse or are dependent on substances (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administra- tion [SAMHSA], Office of Applied Studies, 2007), there are more than 17,000 treatment facilities (SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, 2006). This represents a ratio of 1 treatment facility for every 1,300 people in need. Although authors have called for an extension of the definition of addiction to include behaviors (e.g., Armstrong, Phillips, & Saling, 2000; Goodman, 2001; Potenza, Fiellin, Heninger, Rounsaville, & Mazure, 2002), often known as process addictions , little has been accomplished in formally recognizing disorders that affect millions of clients and their families. Information gathered by the International Association of Addictions and Offender Counselors (IAAOC) Committee on Process Addictions was used to determine the extent and treatment of process addictions and the need for a new diagnostic category. The following ratios of facilities to potential clients suggest that individu- als with process addictions and their families are underserved. 1. Eighty-eight treatment centers (National Eating Disorders Associa- tion, n.d.) exist for 14 to 26 million individuals who have an eating disorder (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000; Hudson, Hiripi, & Pope, 2007; Tenore, 2001). If one takes the midpoint of this range, that translates to 1 center for every 227,000 people. 2. Thirty facilities (Addiction Resource Guide, n.d.-a) are available for the 6 to 9 million individuals with a compulsive gambling disorder (APA, 2000). Again, if one takes the midpoint, that means 1 facility for every 250,000 clients. [05JAOC Hagedorn 1A gs 1/13/09 ] W. Bryce Hagedorn, Department of Child, Family & Community Sciences, University of Central Florida. Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to W. Bryce Hagedorn, Depart- ment of Child, Family & Community Sciences, College of Education, ED 322C, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (e-mail: [email protected]). [AU1] [AU2] [AU1] J ournal of A ddictions & O ffender C ounseling • April 2009 • Volume 29 111 3. Twenty-five centers (Addiction Resource Guide, n.d.-c) exist for the estimated 17 to 37 million Americans who meet the criteria for sexual addiction (Carnes, 2001; Cooper, Delmonico, & Burg, 2000; Wolfe, 2000)....
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The Call for a New Diagnosis - Addictive Disorders - 110 J...

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