Self-concept with Children

Self-concept with Children - Radd, T. R., & Harsh, A. F....

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Radd, T. R., & Harsh, A. F. (1996). Creating a healthy classroom climate while facilitating behavior change: A self-concept approach. Elementary School Guidance & Counseling, 31 (2), 153-158. Professional educators agree that it is important to help students develop a strong self-concept. Professional educators also agree that it is difficult to put a plan in place that can intentionally and consistently help students develop a strong self-concept. To assist professional educators with this difficult responsibility, an informal study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of applying the self-concept series and weave process (Radd, 1993) with students placed into a classroom for students with behavioral disorders. The results demonstrate that the self-concept series and weave process produce an increase of self-concept and an improvement of behavior with students. The following gives information about the self-concept series and weave process, plus practical examples for what you can do within a classroom to put the three steps of the series in place. Even though this study was conducted with students in special education, the ideas can be applied to any classroom. THE SELF-CONCEPT SERIES The self-concept series consists of three steps. 1. Each individual is valuable because he or she is unique and different from any other individual (unconditional acceptance). 2. Because each individual is special and unique, each one has a responsibility to help and not hurt him- or herself, or others. Individuals show that they are remembering that they are important by the way they choose to act. If individuals choose to hurt themselves or others, they are forgetting that they are special. Likewise, if individuals choose to help themselves or others, they are remembering that they are special. When individuals help themselves, they are also helping other individuals through modeling and demonstrating positive behaviors. 3. Individuals are responsible to "watch" their actions to determine if they are remembering the truth that they are special. Individuals are "with" themselves at all times and are accountable to remember to treat themselves as an important human being. Step I is considered the "truth" and addresses self-concept, Step 2 addresses behavior, and Step 3 addresses accountability. Relating the three steps of the self-concept series to situations that occur in life weaves the self-concept series into life skill application. This process of application to life situations is the self-concept series weave (Radd, 1993; Thompson & Rudolph, 1996). USING THE SELF-CONCEPT SERIES Using the self-concept series with students in a special education classroom reduces the need for external "reinforcers" to a minimum. With students that demonstrate mild-to-moderate levels of difficulty behaving, it may replace external reinforcers altogether. External reinforcers put the teacher in control of manipulating students' behaviors. The self-concept series helps students and teachers see themselves as capable people from whom appropriate behaviors can be expected.
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This note was uploaded on 09/12/2011 for the course MHS 6803 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at University of Central Florida.

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Self-concept with Children - Radd, T. R., & Harsh, A. F....

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