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Multicultural Issues in Supervision

Multicultural Issues in Supervision - April 1994 ERIC...

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Multicultural Issues in Supervision Margaret L. Fong Introduction Perhaps two of the most important changes within counseling and counselor education in the past twenty years have been (a) recognition of the need for a multi- cultural perspective in all aspects of counseling and edu- cation and (b) the evolution of supervision models and practices. Recently, these changes culminated in two sets of competency and standards statements that will most certainly guide counselor preparation and evaluation of counselor practice. The Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD) approved a docu- ment outlining multicultural counseling competencies and standards (Sue, Arredondo, & McDavis, l992) and the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES, 1990) adopted comprehensive standards for eleven aspects of counseling supervision. Now counse- lors are recognizing the need to consider multicultural issues in supervision and methods of multicultural supervision. The multicultural perspective will become essential as we move into the twenty-first century. It is projected that by the year 2010 twelve of our most populous states, containing about half of the nation’s young people, will have significant minority populations (Hodgkinson, l992). Thus, the supervision triad of client, counselor, and supervisor will most likely contain persons of differing racial-ethnic backgrounds who are confronting problems and concerns in a diverse social environment. Controversy surrounds the inclusiveness or exclu- siveness of the term multicultural so, for clarity, multi- cultural in this paper will be defined as in the AMCD Standards (Sue et al., 1992), referring to visible racial-eth- nic groups, African-Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, Hispanics and Latinos, and Whites. Currently, very little descriptive and even less research literature on multicultural supervision is available (Leong & Wagner, in press). This paper will summarize two different aspects of multicultural supervision: the inclusion of mul- ticultural issues during supervision and the multicultural supervisory relationship. Multicultural Issues in Supervision Bernard and Goodyear (1992) advocated that the supervisor is responsible for assuring that multicultural issues receive attention in supervision. Generally, when- ever the client is a minority group member, and some- times when either the supervisee or supervisor is a minority person, supervisors will recognize the relevance of addressing cultural concerns. However, all counsel- ing and supervision contacts have cultural, racial-ethnic aspects which shape core assumptions, attitudes, and
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