Saturn - many collisions keep ring thin Rings arent...

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Saturn’s Rings They are made up of numerous, tiny individual particles They orbit over Saturn’s equator They are very thin Rings are given letter names in order of discovery…. A and B rings are separated by the Cassini Division Huge variations between the rings Many gaps are maintained by embedded moons Thickness? Upper limits for A and B rings are about 150 meters From Earth, they look solid. From spacecraft flybys, we see thousands of individual rings. separated by narrow gaps From within the rings, we would see many individual particles size ranges from boulders to dust made of reflective H2O ice (snowballs)
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Unformatted text preview: many collisions keep ring thin Rings arent leftover from planet formation-- the particles are too small to have survived this long.maybe. . There must be a continuous replacement of tiny particles. .we think. . The most likely source is impacts with the jovian moons. .maybe. Jovian planets have rings because they have lots of Moons! Compared to Saturn, the other ring systems: have fewer particles are smaller in extent have darker particles Why??? Other unsolved mysteries: Uranus rings are eccentric and slightly tilted from its equatorial plane. Neptune has partial rings...
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Saturn - many collisions keep ring thin Rings arent...

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