12 - q qChapter 12Master Click to edit 9/13/11 subtitle...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 9/13/11 Examining relationships in quantitative research Chapter 12
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The Role & Value of Marketing Research Information Marketing Research for Managerial Decision Making The Marketing Research Process and Proposal Designing the Marketing Research Project Secondary Data, Literature Reviews, & Hypotheses Exploratory and Observational Research Descriptive and Causal Research Gathering and Collecting Accurate Data Sampling: Theory & Methods Measurement and Scaling Designing the Questionnaire Data Preparation, Analysis, & Reporting of Results Qualitative Data Analysis Quantitative Data Analysis Communicating Marketing Research Findings organizing Framework
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9/13/11 Learning Objectives Understand and evaluate types of relationships between variables Explain concepts of association and covariation Discuss the concept of statistical significance versus practical significance Understand when and how to use regression
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9/13/11 Associative Analyses Associative analyses Determine if stable relationships exist among variables Examples Frito-Lay wants to know what kind of people, and under what circumstances, buy Cheetos GM wants to know what sales promotions are associated with level of customer satisfaction Apple wants to know if purchase intention scores
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9/13/11 Example Suppose that Best Buy has 1,200 retail stores that sell electronics hi-fi and related equipment. The store wants to determine the impact of advertising on store traffic . That is, the number of people who come into the store (on Saturday) as a result of advertising
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9/13/11 Store No.Advertising DollarsStore Traffic (x 1,000) 1 40 90 2 75 125 3 100 320 4 110 200 5 190 600 6 200 450 7 300 400 8 310 700 9 380 800 10 410 810 11 480 1000 12 500 1170 13 520 1200 14 550 1500 15 560 1000 16 580 900 17 690 700 18 700 1000 19 710 1300 20 800 1350 Best buy: Raw Data
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9/13/11 Obj101 Best buy: Scatter Plot
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9/13/11 Relationships Between variables Measuring the association between advertising dollars and store traffic Correlation Using advertising dollars to predict store traffic Simple linear (bivariate) regression Using advertising dollars and friendliness of
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9/13/11 Relationships among variables Four types Nonmonotonic Monotonic Linear Curvilinear
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9/13/11 Nonmonotonic relationship
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9/13/11 Monotonic Relationship
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9/13/11 Relationships among Variables Presence Direction Strength of association Type
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9/13/11 Relationships among Variables Is there a relationship between the two variables we are interested in? What is the direction of the relationship? How strong is the relationship? How can that relationship be best described?
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9/13/11 Covariation & Variable Relationships Covariation Amount of change in one variable consistently related to the change in another variable Measured by correlation coefficient A scatter diagram graphically plots the relative position of two variables using a horizontal and a vertical axis to represent the
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9/13/11 Scatter Diagram: No Relationship
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9/13/11 Positive Relationship
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9/13/11 negative Relationship
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9/13/11 Curvilinear Relationship
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9/13/11
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This note was uploaded on 09/12/2011 for the course MKTG 350 taught by Professor Worsham during the Spring '10 term at South Carolina.

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12 - q qChapter 12Master Click to edit 9/13/11 subtitle...

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