mexican paper

mexican paper - Jon Coleman 3096005 May 27,2010 Word Count:...

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Jon Coleman 3096005 May 27,2010 Word Count: 1963 The PRI What Mexican Democracy Looks Like 1
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Beginning in 1929 under the Maximato of former President Plutarco Elias Calles, the PNR (National Revolutionary Party) has been the major political force within the Mexican government. Operating as the sole political power for roughly 70 years, the PRI (Institutional Revolutionary Party) as it is now called saw Mexico through times of great progress such as the Mexican Miracle of the post-war period, as well as times of great hardship following the 1985 Mexico City earthquake. Over time, the party grew increasingly interested in maintaining power and accumulating personal wealth as opposed to governing effectively. The devolution from a legitimate political force to a dictatorial regime happened over many decades. Instances such as the 1968 crackdowns were early indicators of things to come as students were rounded up, arrested and jailed with little or no explanation. The PRI itself had come to symbolize corruption in Mexico, with many of its top officials living lavish lifestyles off of remedial salaries. Corrupt elections became the most blatant open secret in Mexico attributed to the PRI. The national elections of 1988 are the best known and documented of such corruption, but they were no more corrupt or rigged than any previous electoral contest. Ultimately, the political stability that made the PRI popular in the first place was eroded due to its ineffectiveness in serving the Mexican people. It is impossible to understand Mexican society today without comprehending the role of the PRI. The PRI was born out of the need for stability in Mexico. In the years following the Mexican Revolution that tore the country apart from 1910-1921, political leaders searched for a way to legitimize the succession of power. The Mexican Revolution saw the forced stability of the Porfiriato dashed as more liberal leaders sought to open up government to the people. However, the different regions of Mexico all had their different candidates in mind and thus chaos ensued. The reign of Francisco Madero from 1910-1913 was cut short by a coup-de-tat 2
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led by Victoriano Huerta. Huerta was quickly deposed by Venustanio Carranza with help by the United States. Carranza was then kicked out by the forces of Pancho Villa’s Northern contingent and Emiliano Zapata’s peasant alliance. Carranza however came back to power, established the Constitution of 1917, but was later assassinated in 1921 by an uprising led by Alvaro Obregon. If Mexico was to get back on its feet, it would need to free itself from the rampant political instability that had plagued the Mexican people. Thus was the context and motivation for the creation of a national party. The presidency of Alvaro Obregon brought a sense of stability and progress back to Mexico. The next man to take office, President Calles, stated, “the revolutionary movement has entered its constructive phase” 1 . Calles took on finance reform by creating Mexico’s first National Bank and created the
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This note was uploaded on 09/09/2011 for the course HISTORY 156B taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at UCSB.

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mexican paper - Jon Coleman 3096005 May 27,2010 Word Count:...

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