Chapter 10 Terms and Questions - Valerie Bodden K(10-0014...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Valerie Bodden K. (10-0014) Organization and Methods Professor Mejia March 28, 2011 Chapter 10 Motivation Key Terms -Acquired needs theory: a motivational theory developed by David McClelland that focuses on learned needs- such as those for achievement, power, and affiliation- that become tendencies. The research data collected by McClellan show that high need-achievement individuals prefer to: work on tasks of moderate difficulty, take moderate risk, take personal responsibility for their actions, receive specific/concrete feedback on performances -Content theories: Content theories explain the specific factors that motivate people. They include: McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y, ERG Theory, Herzberg’s Motivation-Hygiene Theory and McClelland’s Theory of Needs. -Equity theory: Concept that people derive job satisfaction and motivation by comparing their efforts ( inputs ) and income ( outputs ) with those of the other people in the same or other firms . -Expectancy theory: Motivational theory based on cognitive psychology . It proposes that people are motivated by their conscious expectations of what will happen if they do certain things, and are more productive when they believe their expectations will be realized . -Goal-setting theory: For goals to increase performance, one must define them as difficult to achieve and as specific. Easily attained goals tend to correlate with lower performance than more difficult goals. A vague goal does not seem likely to enhance performance. A goal can become more specific through quantification or enumeration (specifying a certain number or a list), such as by demanding "increasing productivity by 50%"; or by defining certain tasks that need completing. -In-group: Collection of individuals who have regular contact and frequent interaction, mutual influence , common feeling of camaraderie, and who work together to achieve a common set of goals .
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern