Chapter 8 HW .doc - Stat 203: Statistical Methods Lecture...

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Valerie Bodden K. 10-0014 Statistics II Professor Nicolas 8.16) Sometimes the outcome of a jury trial does the common sense expectation of the general public. Such a verdict is more acceptable if we understand that the jury trial of an accused murderer is analogous to the statistical hypothesis-testing process. The null hypothesis in a jury trial is that the accused is innocent. The alternative hypothesis is guilt, which is accepted only when sufficient evidence exists to establish truth. If the vote of the jury is unanimous in favor of guilt, the null hypothesis of innocence is rejected and the court concludes that the accused murderer is guilty. Any vote other than a unanimous one for guilt results in a not guilty verdict. The court never accepts the null hypothesis: that is, the court never declares the accused Innocent. A not guilty verdict implies that the court could not and the defendant guilty beyond reasonable doubt. (a) Define Type I and Type II errors in a murder trial. Type I error:
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Chapter 8 HW .doc - Stat 203: Statistical Methods Lecture...

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