CaseStudy - A Case Study fmssup Supervisor Emulator Control...

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A Case Study cellmhs pc1mhs pc1proc pc1plc pc1cell pc2cell pc2mhs pc2proc pc2plc pc3cell pc2mhs pc2proc pc4cell pc4mhs pc4proc pc4plc pc3plc fsmhs fsproc1 fsproc2 fsplc fmscell fmssup Supervisor Emulator Control Hierarchy Physical Equiptmemt fscell mhsplc
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Machine 1 Machine 4 Machine 2 Machine 3 Fixturing Stations 1 and 2 Dedicated LAN Cell Controller MHS (PLC) Controller To Network Server 5ft. x 10 ft. Table HO Gauge Train Track Entry Point from Shop Level Exit Point to Shop Level
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Message Server agent initializes and starts a simulation
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An Example The following is an example of a controller for the simple system shown in Figure 1. In this controller, there are five independent copies of the simulation and control tool, each with its own model, running concurrently. The only thing that ties them together into a single-control architecture is the communication among them. When using the model to control the system, the cell’s supervisor is an independent agent that assigns tasks to the cell controller. It is not part of the controller. The PLC controllers that are shown at the bottom-most level of the hierarchy are not implemented in the models, either. Rather, they are implemented by the actual PLC. Although logically they work the same way as the models, the PLC generally does not support our software tool. Because the actual code used to build the models in the PLC cannot be run on the workstations, their actions have to be modeled for use in the simulation. In the real world, controllers are built to manage the cell. The machines in the plant are purchased from an outside vendor and are typically supplied with their own driver. The drivers control the actual machines according to the commands that are recognized by the proprietary controller. The source code for these controllers are typically not supplied with the machine, and therefore, the simulation must model these drivers in order to develop a complete model. The sub-models that are presented between the two horizontal lines are the actual controllers. The rest of the models were created for the purpose of providing a complete model for the simulation and are not used in control mode. See Figure 1. Figure 1: ROOCH decomposition of the model used to control our emulator. Table 1 lists each control object in our model, along with their corresponding types and responsibilities. Table 1: The Coordinated Objects Control Object’s Name Type of Node Nodes Title Nodes Task
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sup Coordinating Node Cell supervisor Assigns jobs to the cell controller. cell Coordinating Node Cell controller Coordinates the cells processing center. proc Processing Node process controller Represents the processor mhs Transport Node MHS controller Controls the MHS for machine. plc
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2011 for the course EEL 5937 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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CaseStudy - A Case Study fmssup Supervisor Emulator Control...

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