G1-Lecture04-Igneous-Rocks

G1-Lecture04-Igneous-Rocks - CEG CEG-4011 Geotechnical...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–16. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: CEG CEG-4011 Geotechnical Engineering I 4011 Geotechnical Engineering I Lecture 04 Lecture 04 Igneous Rocks L. Prieto-Portar, 2008 Batholith Lopolith / Sill Vent Chimney An example of a dike crossing through a limestone formation in Maine. A large dike on Cross-Island Trail, Alaska. This rock is an intrusive igneous rock, that was formed by a pool of lava that hardens under the surface and then becomes visible when the surroundings get eroded. A geologists view of early Earth, 3.5 billion years ago, showing intense volcanic activity, and primitive life-forms that built mound-like structures called stromatolites in shallow water or near bubbling hot springs. Volcanic cones create gap in Djibouti. This satellite photo shows the location of Mount Etna, Europes highest active volcano, at elevation 11,000 feet MSL. It is located at the NE corner of the island of Sicily. A closer view from a Landsat satellite of Mount Etna when it started to erupt in July, 2000. The plume of ash seen in this photo reached across the Mediterranean Sea into Libya (National Geographic). These shots were taken on 17 July, 2000 showing the ash plume and jets of lava emitted by Mount Etna. Borings taken These shots were taken on 17 July, 2000 showing the ash plume and jets of lava emitted by Mount Etna....
View Full Document

Page1 / 45

G1-Lecture04-Igneous-Rocks - CEG CEG-4011 Geotechnical...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 16. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online