G1-Lecture14-Site-Exploration

G1-Lecture14-Site-Exploration - CEG-4011 Geotechnical...

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CEG CEG -4011 Geotechnical Engineering I 4011 Geotechnical Engineering I Lecture #14 Lecture #14 Exploring the Site Site Investigation L. Prieto-Portar 2008
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The Objectives of an Exploration of a Site: The project engineer will prepare a checklist of the items needed to design the structure at each site. Some of these items could be: 1) What is the ideal type and the depth of the foundations for the structure. 2) What is the required load-bearing capacity of the foundations. 3) What are the admissible settlements ? 4) What are the dangers of the site ( for example, a former sanitary landfill, or expansive and collapsible soils, etc). 5) Where is the ground water surface (GWT) , and how much does it vary? 6) What lateral loads may be placed upon the structure? Is the ground slipping, and what is the slope stability ? 7) What constraints are there for construction methods (for example, would a deep garage basement undermine the foundations of an older adjacent building?). 8) Does the structure require long-term monitoring ?
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The Four Major Steps or Components of a Site’s Investigation. A major project (a tunnel, large bridge, tall building, etc.), will require four phases for its site investigation: Phase 1: Literature Search. This phase collects all the existing information of the site and the structure. For the site, it involves aerial photos, surveys, previous geotechnical data, building codes and adjacent structures. For the structure, it requires all the major structural data of the building. Phase II: Reconnaissance Sub-surface Exploration. The site and the neighborhood is carefully studied. Test pits are excavated, soil borings and penetrometers are driven, samples of soil at each strata are taken, the ground water is established, percolation tests are performed and in-situ testing is completed. Phase III: Laboratory Testing and Reports. The samples are taken to the laboratory and engineering parameters are determined, in order to calculate bearing capacities, settlements and special solutions. All the data from these first three phases are summarized in a Geotechnical and Foundation Recommendations Report. Phase IV: Detailed Site Investigation. Very large projects will require an expansion of the three phases above.
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Phase I: Literature Search: 1) The major components of the structure, loads, spacing of columns, shear walls, etc. Expected lateral loads (wind and seismic loads); 2) Collect all applicable local codes (FBC) and national building codes; 3) Local consulting engineers, aerial survey companies, soil testing laboratories, etc. with some knowledge of the site, borings, well logs, adjacent structures, etc. 4) Locate all underground improvements, such as utilities, from County (WASD, FP&L, DPW, UNCLE) and State agencies. 5)
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This note was uploaded on 09/11/2011 for the course CEG 4011 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '10 term at FIU.

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G1-Lecture14-Site-Exploration - CEG-4011 Geotechnical...

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