PE-12-Shear-Strength

PE-12-Shear-Strength - 12 - Shear Strength of Soils Problem...

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12 - Shear Strength of Soils Problem #01: Find the maximum shear on the failure plane. Problem #02: Why the max shear is not the shear failure. Problem #03: Find the maximum principal stress. Problem #04: Effective maximum principal stress. Problem #05: The p-q diagram. Problem #06: Consolidated-drained triaxial results. Problem #07: Shear strength of clay from field data. Problem #08: Find the cohesion from consolidated-drained triaxial. Problem #09: Plotting shear-box test results. Problem #10: Strength of a potential shearing plane. Problem #11: Mohr-Coulomb failure envelope from field data. Problem #12: Shear strength of a clay stratum. Problem #13: Find the principal stresses of a sample. Problem #14:Formula to find max principal from c, φ and min. 250
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Liquefaction-01: Conditions leading to liquefaction. (Revision: March-09) Select the conditions that will lead to a liquefaction of a soil stratum, and the collapse of the structures placed upon them. 1) The earthquake intensity and duration. 2) Sub-surface blasting. 3) Near-surface groundwater table (phreatic surface). 4) Granular soils (especially clean sands, gravels and non-cohesive silts). 5) Granular soils in a very loose relative density. 6) Poorly graded granular soils. 7) Low confining pressures. 8) Shallow soil strata, within a maximum depth of 15 m (50 feet) from the surface. 9) Newly deposited soils. 10) Inability of the soil to dissipate quickly the excess pore water from the quake. Select the correct answer. (a) Conditions 1 through 4. (b) Conditions 5 through 7. (c) Conditions 8 through 10. (d) All of the above conditions.
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Liquefaction-02: Determine if a soil will liquefy under a new building. (Revision: March-09) Determine if a new office building will probably collapse through liquefaction of the surficial soil strata under the conditions listed below. The upper 4 m of the soil is a SP with 4% passing the #200 sieve. There is an active earthquake fault line close to the property. The area uses a peak ground acceleration a max = 0.4 g , and an earthquake of magnitude M = 7.5 is expected within the service life of the building (60 years). The phreatic surface is 1.5 m below the level ground surface. A SPT was performed at a depth of 3 m , and yielded an N 60 = 5. At a depth of 3 m the total vertical stress is σ vo = 58 kPa and the effective vertical stress σ vo ‘= 43 kPa . Solution. 065 max vo earthquake d d ' vo Liquefation can be determined through the Seed-Idriss concept of shear stress ratio (SSR), which is the stress induced by the aerthquake in the soil. a SSR . r where r g σ ⎛⎞ == ⎜⎟ ⎝⎠ () 10 0 1 2 04 58 0 65 1 012 0 65 1 0 012 3 43 034 max vo ' vo earthquake soil .z For this problem, the parameter are, a . g kPa SSR . z . . m gg SSR . Now we determine the SSR that will cause the in-sit ⎛ ⎞ ⎡⎤ =− ⎜ ⎟ ⎣⎦ ⎝ ⎠ = k P a 16 0 60 100 100 43 008 425 1 ' vo soil earthquake soil u soil to liquefy.
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This note was uploaded on 09/11/2011 for the course CEG 4011 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '10 term at FIU.

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PE-12-Shear-Strength - 12 - Shear Strength of Soils Problem...

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