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MET4994_5994_RS_Lec25_S11

MET4994_5994_RS_Lec25_S11 - MET MET 4994 Remote Sensing...

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MET 4994 Remote Sensing: Radar and Satellite Meteorology MET 5994 Remote Sensing in Meteorology Lecture 25: March 23, 2011 Satellite Obits
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Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation 1 2 2 Gm m F r Where G is the universal gravitation constant The force of attraction between two point mass m 1 and m 2 separated by a distance r is
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Circular Satellite Orbit 2 2 e Gm m mv r r Where v is the orbital velocity of the satellite. mv 2 /r is the centripital force required to keep the satellite in a circular orbit. Assuming that the earth is a sphere, we can treat it as a point mass.
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Radius for a Satellite in Geostationary/Geosynchronous Orbit 2 T Where T is the period of the satellite. Therefore, The satellite in geostationary orbit has the same angular velocity as the earth. The angular velocity of a satellite is, 2 r T v 3 2 e Gm r Inserting the angular velocity of the Earth, r=42,164 km, or 35,786 km above the Earth’s surface. 2 2 3 4 e T r Gm
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Ellipse Geometry 2 (1 ) 1 cos a r a=Semimajor axis;
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