MET4994_5994_RS_Lec26_S11

MET4994_5994_RS_Lec26_S11 - MET MET 4994 4994 Remote...

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Unformatted text preview: MET MET 4994 4994 Remote Sensing: Radar and Satellite Meteorology Remote Sensing: Radar and Satellite Meteorology MET MET 5994 5994 Remote Sensing in Meteorology Remote Sensing in Meteorology Lecture 26: March 28, 2011 Meteorological Satellite Obits (1) Orbital Elements Orbital Elements Mean anomaly: is related to the true anomaly and eccentricity . Epoch time: the time when these elements are observed or are valid. Keplerian Keplerian Orbits Orbits Orbits in which the classical elements (except mean anomaly M) are constant. The satellite moves in an elliptical path with the center of the Earth at one focus. The ellipse maintains a constant size, shape, and orientation with respect to the Sun. Keplerian orbit Orbits Used in Meteorological Orbits Used in Meteorological Remote Sensing Remote Sensing Sunsynchronous Orbit: the orbit that is synchronized with the sun. The satellite crosses the equator at the same local time. Geostationary Orbit (GEO): synchronized with the Earth. At very high altitude (~35,000 km above Earth). Low Earth Orbit (LEO): the orbit that is 200 to 1200 km above Earth (to distinguish from GEO). Polar Orbit (or near-polar orbit): Any LEO that reaches high latitude. Equatorial Orbits: Low inclination angle, thus orbits near the equator. Polar orbiting satellites are launched into orbits at high inclination angles, such that they pass across high latitudes near the poles. Most polar orbits are circular to slightly elliptical at distances ranging from 700 to 1700 km (435 - 1056 mi) from the Earth. At different altitudes they travel at different speeds....
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2011 for the course MET 4994 taught by Professor Haijan during the Spring '11 term at FIU.

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MET4994_5994_RS_Lec26_S11 - MET MET 4994 4994 Remote...

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