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MET4994_5994_RS_Lec27_S11

MET4994_5994_RS_Lec27_S11 - MET MET 4994 Remote Sensing...

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MET 4994 Remote Sensing: Radar and Satellite Meteorology MET 5994 Remote Sensing in Meteorology Lecture 27: March 30, 2011 Meteorological Satellite Obits (2)
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Geosynchronous means that the satellite orbits with the same angular velocity as the Earth. Geostationary (GEO) orbit is geosynchronous, but it is also required to have zero inclination angle (around equator) and zero eccentricity (circular). The geostationary satellites (GEOs) circle the Earth in a geostationary orbit above the equator which means that they hover continuously over one place on the Earth’s surface. Video: Geostationary Orbits http://www.hurricanescience.org/science/observation/satellites/geostationary/
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US GOES Satellites GOES (geostationary operational environmental satellites) East: over the US east coast. GOES West: one over the US west coast. Between them they can provide images for the whole U.S. Future GOES-R (2015): higher spatial and temporal resolution. Full-disc view from GOES west. Full-disc view from GOES East.
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GOES US coverage
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1. Continuous observation and high temporal resolution : Since the field of view of a satellite in geostationary orbit is fixed, it always views the same geographical area, day or night. This is ideal for making regular sequential observations of cloud patterns over a region with visible and infrared radiometers.
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