Nutrition_Lab_#3

Nutrition_Lab_#3 - Lab#3 The Amount of Fat in Common Fast...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lab #3: The Amount of Fat in Common Fast Foods Joe Wallace Section 009-A Julie Ryan Karon Felten Title: The Amount of Fat in Common Fast Foods
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction: Though contrary to popular belief, fats and oils are an essential part to a healthy diet, but only in small amounts. Fats and oils provide energy, transport fat-soluble vitamins, maintain cell function and protection, and give foods texture and flavor. Most people think that by avoiding fats altogether, they will live a healthier life. The truth is, it completely depends on what type of fats we consume. For example, there are three, major different types of fats. The first is saturated fats. These fats have no carbons joined together with a double bond in their chemical make-up and are generally solid at room temperature. Saturated fats are most notorious for the damage they can do to a body if consumed in excessive amounts. Some health consequences of these types of fats are an increased risk of heart disease, because they increase blood cholesterol levels by altering the way cholesterol is removed from the blood. Types of foods that saturated fats are found in are butter, cream, cheese, whole milk, and beef fat (1). Another type of fat is unsaturated fats. This type of fat is made up of three other subgroups. Two types of unsaturated fats are monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats. Monounsaturated fats have two carbons in their chain bound to each other with one double bond in their chemical make-up. Olive oil, canola oil, peanut oil, and cashew nuts contain monounsaturated fats. Polyunsaturated fats have more than one double bond of carbons in their chemical make-up. Cottonseed, canola, corn, and safflower oils contain polyunsaturated fats. Both are generally liquid at room temperature. These fats are most recommended for consumption in moderation because they do not increase blood cholesterol levels. Therefore, when consumed in moderation, these fats do not increase the risk of heart disease (1).
Background image of page 2
The last type of unsaturated fat is trans fat. Trans fats are unsaturated fats formed when vegetable oils are processed and made more solid, also known as hydrogenating oils. The reason for processing vegetable oils is to support freshness and texture of foods. As compared with saturated fats, trans fats can also increase the risk of heart disease, because they increase blood cholesterol levels as well. Trans fats are found in meat and dairy products (1). Fat consumption is also dependent on age, gender, size, health, and physical activity levels. Though major steps have been taken to reduce the consumption of unhealthy fats in diets, fat intake for those living in the United States and Canada still surpasses 35% of total calories consumed (2). Fats are also dangerous to people monitoring their fat intake, because they can be hidden in pre-packaged foods and fast foods. In response to increased disapproval of hidden, saturated and trans fats in most fast food
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 13

Nutrition_Lab_#3 - Lab#3 The Amount of Fat in Common Fast...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online