Nutrition_Lab_#4

Nutrition_Lab_#4 - I Love Food Joe Wallace Section 009-A...

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I Love Food Joe Wallace Section 009-A Julie Ryan Karon Felten
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Introduction: Nutrition and diet control are some of the most important factors contributing to a healthy lifestyle. Designing a healthy diet can improve our health, prevent certain diseases, achieve and maintain a desirable weight, and maintain our energy and vitality (1). But over the last thirty years, especially with the new institution of fast food and prepackaged meals, nutritional diets have been pushed aside by convenience, saving money, and speedy preparation. This means that most Americans are not getting the proper nutritional requirements vital for maintaining bodily functions. A large percentage of Americans are consuming these prepackaged meals. Though these meals may be easy to prepare, they contain poor nutritional quality. Today, most diets are larger in quantity, which means greater numbers in fat and calorie intake. One important consideration for analyzing one’s diet is physical activity. While high calorie diets are perfectly fine for an active lifestyle, if they are not burned off, those excess calories will be stored as fat. In fact, a report from Harvard University stated that Americans eat two hundred calories more food energy per day than they expend (2). In this laboratory experience, we will have the opportunity to analyze our personal nutritional quality and the risks and benefits connected to our diet. What we eat directly affects our bodies and contributes to our wellness. Defined as a multidimensional process, which includes physical, emotional, and spiritual health, wellness is critically affected by our nutritional intake. With diet affecting so many aspects of our livelihood, most Americans still maintain poor food choices everyday. Though we may not be feeling the effects of those choices right now, our unhealthy decisions can lead to health complications in the future. Osteoporosis, high blood pressure and cholesterol, type II diabetes, and heart disease are just some of the health problems that can be caused by poor dieting.
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To help with those nutritional decisions, the U.S. Department of Agriculture developed an innovative tool called the Food Pyramid. The goal of this project is to advance and promote dietary guidance for all Americans, and conduct applied research and analyses in nutrition and consumer economics (3). Through the development of the MyPyramid Food Guidance System, Americans can now be informed on the type and amount of food they should be consuming everyday. The Pyramid stresses that a healthful diet has a strong emphasis on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, beans, nuts, low saturated and trans fats, low cholesterol, low salt and low added sugars. Not only these types of foods, but a variety of these foods makes for a truly healthful diet. In the laboratory experience, we will be able to assess our diet so that we can make informed decisions about nutritional quality and quantity in the future. Methods:
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Nutrition_Lab_#4 - I Love Food Joe Wallace Section 009-A...

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