5 Physics 6A Incline and Friction Examples

5 Physics 6A Incline and Friction Examples - Incline and...

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Unformatted text preview: Incline and Friction Examples Physics 6A Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Friction is a force that opposes the motion of surfaces that are in contact with each other. We will consider 2 types of friction in this class: KINETIC Friction for surfaces that are in motion (sliding) STATIC Friction for surfaces at rest Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Friction is a force that opposes the motion of surfaces that are in contact with each other. We will consider 2 types of friction in this class: KINETIC Friction for surfaces that are in motion (sliding) STATIC Friction for surfaces at rest The formulas are very similar each one has a coefficient of friction () that determines how much of the Normal force is translated into friction force. Crucial distinction kinetic friction will be a constant force, while static friction will be just strong enough to keep the surfaces from slipping Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Friction is a force that opposes the motion of surfaces that are in contact with each other. We will consider 2 types of friction in this class: KINETIC Friction for surfaces that are in motion (sliding) STATIC Friction for surfaces at rest The formulas are very similar each one has a coefficient of friction () that determines how much of the Normal force is translated into friction force. Crucial distinction kinetic friction will be a constant force, while static friction will be just strong enough to keep the surfaces from slipping Here are the formulas: Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB N F N F s static k kinetic = See friction is FUN ! Static friction will have a maximum value. If you push any harder the surfaces will slip and you get kinetic friction instead! Example pushing a box across the floor There is a 100kg box at rest on a horizontal floor. The coefficients of friction are k =0.5 and s =0.6. You want to push it across the room, so you push (horizontally) until it starts to slide. Once it starts to move, you keep pushing with constant force. a) How hard do you have to push to get the box moving? b) How far will the box travel if you push for 3 seconds? Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB First we draw a diagram of the forces. weight Normal force Fpush friction x y Example pushing a box across the floor There is a 100kg box at rest on a horizontal floor. The coefficients of friction are k =0.5 and s =0.6. You want to push it across the room, so you push (horizontally) until it starts to slide....
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5 Physics 6A Incline and Friction Examples - Incline and...

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