8 Physics 6A Momentum

8 Physics 6A Momentum - Momentum and Impulse Physics 6A...

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Unformatted text preview: Momentum and Impulse Physics 6A Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Momentum any moving object will have both momentum and kinetic energy We use a lowercase p for momentum here is the formula v m p = Notice that this is a vector, so you will have to break into components when adding up the momenta of several objects. Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Momentum any moving object will have both momentum and kinetic energy We use a lowercase p for momentum here is the formula v m p = Notice that this is a vector, so you will have to break into components when adding up the momenta of several objects. Impulse if the momentum of an object changes, then either its mass or its velocity must have changed. In most cases, we will consider the mass to be constant, so a change in momentum will mean the object accelerated (velocity changed). So there must have been a force applied to it. This gives us a formula: t F p J avg = = This is just Newtons 2 nd Law can you see why? Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Momentum any moving object will have both momentum and kinetic energy We use a lowercase p for momentum here is the formula v m p = Notice that this is a vector, so you will have to break into components when adding up the momenta of several objects. Impulse if the momentum of an object changes, then either its mass or its velocity must have changed. In most cases, we will consider the mass to be constant, so a change in momentum will mean the object accelerated (velocity changed). So there must have been a force applied to it. This gives us a formula: t F p J avg = = This is just Newtons 2 nd Law can you see why? Solve this for F avg to get a m t v m t p F avg = = = Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Typical Example: A golf ball (initially at rest) is struck by a club, and the ball is given a velocity of 50 m/s. If the mass of the ball is 46 grams and the club is in contact with the ball for 5 ms, what is the average force applied to the ball by the club? Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Typical Example: A golf ball (initially at rest) is struck by a club, and the ball is given a velocity of 50 m/s. If the mass of the ball is 46 grams and the club is in contact with the ball for 5 ms, what is the average force applied to the ball by the club? We can find the impulse (change in momentum) directly in this problem: Take a minute and compute it for yourself Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Typical Example: A golf ball (initially at rest) is struck by a club, and the ball is given a velocity of 50 m/s....
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8 Physics 6A Momentum - Momentum and Impulse Physics 6A...

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