13.2 Physics 6B Fluids - Hydrodynamics

13.2 Physics 6B Fluids - Hydrodynamics - Fluids -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Fluids - Hydrodynamics Physics 6B Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB With the following assumptions, we can find a few simple formulas to describe flowing fluids: Incompressible the fluid does not change density due to the pressure exerted on it. No Viscosity- this means there is no internal friction in the fluid. Laminar Flow the fluid flows smoothly, with no turbulence. Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB With the following assumptions, we can find a few simple formulas to describe flowing fluids: Incompressible the fluid does not change density due to the pressure exerted on it. No Viscosity- this means there is no internal friction in the fluid. Laminar Flow the fluid flows smoothly, with no turbulence. With these assumptions, we get the following equations: Continuity this is conservation of mass for a flowing fluid. 2 2 1 1 v A v A t V = = Bernoullis Equation- this is conservation of energy per unit volume for a flowing fluid. 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 v gy p v gy p + + = + + Here A=area of the cross-section of the fluids container, and the small v is the speed of the fluid. Notice that there is a potential energy term and a kinetic energy term on each side. Some examples will help clarify how to use these equations: Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Example 1: Water travels through a 9.6cm diameter fire hose with a speed of 1.3m/s. At the end of the hose, the water flows out through a nozzle whose diameter is 2.5 cm. What is the speed of the water coming out of the nozzle? Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Example 1: Water travels through a 9.6cm diameter fire hose with a speed of 1.3m/s. At the end of the hose, the water flows out through a nozzle whose diameter is 2.5 cm. What is the speed of the water coming out of the nozzle? Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB We use continuity for this one. We have most of the information, but dont forget we need the cross-sectional areas , so we need to compute them from the given diameters. 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 v A A v v A v A = = slower here faster here Example 1: Water travels through a 9.6cm diameter fire hose with a speed of 1.3m/s. At the end of the hose, the water flows out through a nozzle whose diameter is 2.5 cm. What is the speed of the water coming out of the nozzle? Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB We use continuity for this one. We have most of the information, but dont forget we need the cross-sectional areas , so we need to compute them from the given diameters....
View Full Document

Page1 / 24

13.2 Physics 6B Fluids - Hydrodynamics - Fluids -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online