17.1 Physics 6B Electric Field examples long

17.1 Physics 6B Electric Field examples long - Physics 6B...

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Unformatted text preview: Physics 6B Electric Field Examples Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Electric charge can be either positive or negative. Matter is chiefly comprised of electrons (negative), protons (positive) and neutrons (electrically neutral). A neutral object will have equal numbers of protons and electrons. Most of the time it is the negatively-charged electrons that can move back and forth between objects, so a negatively charged object has excess electrons, and a positively charged object has too few electrons. Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Electric charge can be either positive or negative. Matter is chiefly comprised of electrons (negative), protons (positive) and neutrons (electrically neutral). A neutral object will have equal numbers of protons and electrons. Most of the time it is the negatively-charged electrons that can move back and forth between objects, so a negatively charged object has excess electrons, and a positively charged object has too few electrons. Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Elementary charge: Charge is quantized, which means that the charge on any object is always a multiple the charge on a proton (or electron). e = 1.6 x 10-19 C This is the smallest possible charge. Units for charge are Coulombs. The Coulomb is a very large unit, so you can expect to see tiny values like nano-Coulombs. Charges interact with each other via the Electric Force. Rules for interaction are based on the sign of the charge as follows: * Like charges repel * Opposite charges attract The force is given by Coulombs Law: Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Notice that this is just the magnitude of the force, and the r is the center-to-center distance between the two charges. My advice is to not put +- signs into this formula. Instead, find the direction of the force based on the attract/repel rules above. 2 2 C m N 9 2 2 1 elec 10 9 k r q q k F = = Coulombs Constant 17.22 Two point charges are located on the x-axis as follows: charge q 1 = +4 nC at position x=0.2m and charge q 2 = +5 nC at position x = -0.3m. a) Find the magnitude and direction of the net electric field produced by q 1 and q 2 at the origin. b) Find the net electric force on a charge q 3 =-0.6nC placed at the origin....
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This note was uploaded on 09/09/2011 for the course PHYSICS 6b taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at UCSB.

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17.1 Physics 6B Electric Field examples long - Physics 6B...

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