24.1 Physics 6C Geometric Optics

24.1 Physics 6C Geometric Optics - Physics 6C Geometric...

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Unformatted text preview: Physics 6C Geometric Optics Mirrors and Thin Lenses Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB We have already learned the basics of Reflection and Refraction. Reflection - angle of incidence = angle of reflection Refraction - light bends toward the normal according to Snells Law Now we apply those concepts to some simple types of mirrors and lenses. Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB We have already learned the basics of Reflection and Refraction: Reflection - angle of incidence = angle of reflection Refraction - light bends toward the normal according to Snells Law Now we apply those concepts to some simple types of mirrors and lenses. Flat Mirror This is the simplest mirror a flat reflecting surface. The light rays bounce off and you see an image that seems to be behind the mirror. This is called a VIRTUAL IMAGE because the light rays do not actually travel behind the mirror. The image will appear reversed, but will be the same size and the same distance from the mirror. A typical light ray entering the eye of the viewer is shown. The object distance is labeled S and the image distance is labeled S. Virtual Image S S Real Object Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Spherical Mirrors For curved mirrors we will assume that the shape is spherical (think of a big shiny ball, and slice off any piece of that theres your spherical mirror). This will make our math relatively simple, with only a couple of formulas. The hard part will be to get the negative signs correct. The radius of curvature describes the shape of the mirror. This is the same as the radius of the big shiny ball that the mirror was cut from. We will have two types of mirrors, depending on which direction they curve: CONCAVE mirrors curve toward you, and have POSITIVE R (like the inside of the sphere). CONVEX mirrors curve away from you, and have NEGATIVE R (think of the outside of the ball). There is a point called the FOCAL POINT which is halfway between the mirror and the center. Concave Mirror R is positive Convex Mirror R is negative R C R C Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance Services at UCSB Shiny side Shiny side We will learn 2 techniques for dealing with mirrors (and lenses): Graphical draw the light rays and the image is at their intersection....
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This note was uploaded on 09/09/2011 for the course PHYSICS 6c taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at UCSB.

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24.1 Physics 6C Geometric Optics - Physics 6C Geometric...

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