{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

30.2 Physics 6C Radioactivity

30.2 Physics 6C Radioactivity - Physics6C Radioactivity...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Physics 6C Radioactivity Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance  Services at UCSB
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance  Services at UCSB Alpha Decay ( α ) When a nucleus is too large to be stable, it will often emit an alpha-particle, which is really just a helium  nucleus (2 protons and two neutrons).  The alpha particle carries away some energy, and the resulting  nucleus has 2 fewer protons and 2 fewer neutrons (and thus is 2 places lower on the periodic table). Types of Radioactive Decay
Background image of page 2
Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance  Services at UCSB Alpha Decay ( α ) When a nucleus is too large to be stable, it will often emit an alpha-particle, which is really just a helium  nucleus (2 protons and two neutrons).  The alpha particle carries away some energy, and the resulting  nucleus has 2 fewer protons and 2 fewer neutrons (and thus is 2 places lower on the periodic table). Types of Radioactive Decay Beta Decay ( β ) When a nucleus has too many excess neutrons, it may undergo beta-minus decay, whereby a neutron  decays into a proton and an electron.  The electron is emitted, leaving the nucleus with one more  proton than before (and one less neutron).  So the result is an atom that is one step higher on the  periodic table.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Prepared by Vince Zaccone For Campus Learning Assistance  Services at UCSB Alpha Decay ( α ) When a nucleus is too large to be stable, it will often emit an alpha-particle, which is really just a helium  nucleus (2 protons and two neutrons).  The alpha particle carries away some energy, and the resulting  nucleus has 2 fewer protons and 2 fewer neutrons (and thus is 2 places lower on the periodic table). Types of Radioactive Decay Beta Decay ( β ) When a nucleus has too many excess neutrons, it may undergo beta-minus decay, whereby a neutron  decays into a proton and an electron.  The electron is emitted, leaving the nucleus with one more  proton than before (and one less neutron).  So the result is an atom that is one step higher on the  periodic table.
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}