cj-032111 stem cells and hematopoiesis

cj-032111 stem cells and hematopoiesis - Hematopoiesis...

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Hematopoiesis C. Jamieson, MD PhD  Director, Stem Cell Research Program,  Moores UCSD Cancer Center  
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Blood Development Blood development also known as hematopoiesis has long been the subject of morbid curiosity and intense scientific inquiry. The robust regenerative capacity of the hematopoietic system is vital for human survival. Everyday the human body makes 200 billion new red blood cells responsible for carrying oxygen and lesser numbers of white blood cells that fight infection as well as platelets that clot the blood. The entire hematopoietic system can be regenerated by a single blood forming stem cell called a hematopoietic stem cell that normally resides in the marrow but can be mobilized in response to injury or stress.
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Erythrocyte (Red Blood Cell) Gas Exchange
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Platelet Plug Platelet Plug Formation
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Neutrophil Phagocytosis
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Innate Immunity: Macrophage Activation
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T lymphocyte help
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T lymphocyte help Macrophage Activation
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BONE MARROW The Blood Factory The bone marrow has a specialized microenvironment or niche. The niche supports regeneration HSC and differentiation into progenitors Stem cells were identified in 1963 by Till and McCulloch
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Normal Hematopoiesis 1. Weissman and colleagues identified HSC 1. HSC and progenitor populations change in number and function during aging. 1. Long-term HSC (LT-HSC) have robust self- renewal capacity, which is lost as differentiate into short-term hematopoietic stem cells (ST- HSC). 2. Multipotent progenitors ( MPP) differentiate into immune cells (T, B or NK) or myeloid cells based on the balance of transcription factors in the progenitor population. 3. Common myeloid progenitors (CMP) differentiate into megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitors (MEP), which give rise to red blood cells platelets, and granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMP) which differentiate into granulocytes and macrophages that fight bacterial infections. 4. Common lymphoid progenitors (CLP) give rise to T cells, NK cell and B cell cells thereby providing immunity against viral and fungal infections as well as immune surveillance against malignancies.
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HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS (HSC) Definition : one HSC can regenerate the entire hematopoietic system HSC Functional Properties : 1.Enhanced Survival 2.Self-renewal 3.Multi-lineage Differentiation HSC Dependence on the Niche
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cj-032111 stem cells and hematopoiesis - Hematopoiesis...

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