Gender and Entrepreneurship as a Career Choice

Gender and - Social Psychology Quarterly http/spq.sagepub.com Gender and Entrepreneurship as a Career Choice Do Self-assessments of Ability Matter

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http://spq.sagepub.com/ Quarterly Social Psychology http://spq.sagepub.com/content/early/2010/07/28/0190272510377882 The online version of this article can be found at: DOI: 10.1177/0190272510377882 published online 30 July 2010 Social Psychology Quarterly Sarah Thébaud Matter? Gender and Entrepreneurship as a Career Choice: Do Self-assessments of Ability Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: American Sociological Association can be found at: Social Psychology Quarterly Additional services and information for http://spq.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://spq.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: at OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV on August 2, 2010 spq.sagepub.com Downloaded from
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Gender and Entrepreneurship as a Career Choice: Do Self-assessments of Ability Matter? SARAH THE ´ BAUD Cornell University The gender gap in entrepreneurship has typically been understood through women’s struc- tural disadvantages in acquiring the resources relevant for successful business ownership. This study builds on resource-based approaches to investigate how cultural beliefs about gender influence the process by which individuals initially come to identify entrepreneurship as a viable labor-market option. Drawing on status characteristics theory, this study eval- uates (1) how cultural beliefs about gender and entrepreneurship influence self-assessments of entrepreneurial ability, and (2) the extent to which such assessments account for the gen- der gap in business start-ups. Results suggest that women are significantly less likely to per- ceive themselves as able to be an entrepreneur and they hold themselves to a stricter standard of competence when compared to similarly situated men. This gender difference in self-assessments accounts for a significant portion of the gender gap in entrepreneurship after controlling for relevant resources. Additional analyses reveal that significant gender differences in self-assessed ability persist among established business owners. Keywords : gender, entrepreneurship, status characteristics theory, self-assessments of ability W omen have started businesses in significantly greater numbers over the past two decades, though gen- der inequality in entrepreneurship continues to be especially pronounced when compared to the traditional labor market (Aldrich 2005; OECD 1998). For example, in 2005, women comprised 56 percent of professional and technical workers and 42 percent of legis- lators, senior officials, and managers (UNDP 2008). By contrast, in the same period, women were majority owners of only 30 per- cent of all privately held U.S. firms (Center for Women’s Business Research 2004). Even when taking into account income,
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2011 for the course EEE 3033 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Oklahoma State.

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Gender and - Social Psychology Quarterly http/spq.sagepub.com Gender and Entrepreneurship as a Career Choice Do Self-assessments of Ability Matter

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