New_Agenda_presentation

New_Agenda_presentation - THE NEW AGENDA FOR MINORITY...

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THE NEW AGENDA FOR MINORITY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT The Boston Consulting Group June 2005 Presented by Group 1 Adam Ware Nathan Peck Jolee Smith Pamela Fortney
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What’s the point? A gap exists between where minority businesses are now, and where they should be. Better developed minority businesses provide enhancements for the economy as a whole Revitalized inner-city communities Expanded tax base Newly created jobs
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Who are we talking about? Minority Businesses A business that is at least 51% owned and controlled by one or more members of the following minority groups African Americans Hispanic Americans Asian and Pacific Islander Americans Native Americans and Alaskan Native Americans
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Who are we talking about? These groups represent 28% of the U.S. population However, they represent only 15% of all U.S. businesses
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Where do we come from? “The challenge of developing strong minority businesses has undergone a gradual but continuous process of reinvention” Historically, the rationale for minority business development has been grounded in 3 beliefs Minority business development fosters economic development particularly in the inner city Minority groups have long been growing as a percentage of Americans and are on the verge of becoming a majority As minority businesses expand, their founders and CEOs will emerge as an insightful and powerful cadre of new business and civic leaders
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Development of Minority Business over the last 40 years The 1960s. Early policy makers were active in designing a wide range of programs that sought to assist ethnic minorities in building competitive capabilities by providing access to previously inaccessible opportunities - specifically in education, housing, employment, and, most importantly, business.
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Development of Minority Business over the last 40 years The 1970s. As political agendas shifted: The federal government and many large urban centers began to launch programs for small minority-owned firms, providing access to purchasing opportunities with governmental agencies as well as limited financing.
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Development of Minority Business over the last 40 years At roughly the same time, major corporations began to recognize that urban communities were critical to their continued economic growth and development. Therefore, these private players created similar
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2011 for the course EEE 3033 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Oklahoma State.

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New_Agenda_presentation - THE NEW AGENDA FOR MINORITY...

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