Attachment Part 1

Attachment Part 1 - Running Head: ATTACHMENT STYLES 1...

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Running Head: ATTACHMENT STYLES 1 Attachment Styles: Infancy, Toddlerhood, Early Childhood, Middle Childhood Angela Cochrane Oklahoma State University-Tulsa Campus
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ATTACHMENT STYLES 2 Attachment Styles: Infancy, Toddlerhood, Early Childhood, Middle Childhood In the early years of life, children form important attachments to the main caregivers in their lives, whether they are positive attachments or negative attachments. In 1969, John Bowlby published work on a new theory he developed called Attachment Theory (Meyer and Pilkonis, 2001, p. 466). He developed three different attachment styles that he believed people formed; secure, anxious-ambivalent, and anxious- avoidant. Attachment theory is the idea that children form strong bonds with their caregivers at a young age that will impact the rest of their life. Collins and Feeney (2000) maintatined that children establish a sort of ‘safe haven’ with their caregiver; and when their caregiver is not around the child becomes distressed (p. 1054). This attachment that they form then lays a foundational framework for their relationships for the rest of their lives. This foundation is known as an “internal working model” (Meyer and Pilkonis, 2001, p. 466). Since Bowlby’s development of the Attachment Theory, much research has been done on Attachment Styles and its affect on adult relationships (Meyer and Pilkonis 2001, pp. 466). Mary Ainsworth, a follower of Bowlby’s work, modified Bowlby’s three styles of attachment and created a fourth; resulting in her own four styles of attachment: secure, in which a person is “low in both attachment-related anxiety and avoidance”;
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This note was uploaded on 09/12/2011 for the course HDFS 3113 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Oklahoma State.

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Attachment Part 1 - Running Head: ATTACHMENT STYLES 1...

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