COCHRANE - Running Head: ATTACHMENT STYLES 1 Attachment...

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Unformatted text preview: Running Head: ATTACHMENT STYLES 1 Attachment Styles: Infancy, Toddlerhood, Early Childhood, Middle Childhood Angela Cochrane Oklahoma State University-Tulsa Campus Attachment Styles: Infancy, Toddlerhood, Early Childhood, Middle Childhood ATTACHMENT STYLES 2 In middle childhood, attachment styles are beginning to shift from solely the parents to other sources such as peers and siblings. Seibert and Kerns conduct a research projectts that is aimed at discovering children’s most prominent attachment figures. The purpose of their study was to identify people in the participants lives that were attachment figures but were not their parents. Seibert and Kerns recruited 115 participants from elementary schools and summer camps. The study included a fairly even number of boys and girls: 55 boys and 59 girls. The age range of participants was from 7-12 years old. Most participants classified themselves as Caucasian. About 3% of the participants were Asian; about 1% African American; and nearly 6% were classified as ‘other.’ Most children came from a dual parent household, while less than 10% came from a single parent household. Most children had at least one older sibling, and more than 30% had younger siblings. Only 9% of the participants were an only child (2009). Seibert and Kerns had researchers conduct 15 minute interviews that consisted of two parts. The first part of the interview was the Social Network Interview . The Second interview was the Attachment figure interview. In the social network interview children were given an image of three circles: an inner circle, a middle circle, and an outer circle. Participants were asked to choose people to go on each of these circles (they also had the option to choose no one). For the inner circle they were supposed to choose a person whom they felt the closest to and that was irreplaceable. For the middle circle, they were asked to choose someone whom they did not feel as close to but was still an important person in their life. For the outer circle, they were asked to choose someone who is important enough in their everyday life that they should be mentioned. During the attachment figure interview, participants were given different scenarios and asked to choose someone, or no one, whom they would go to when presented with that particular situation (2009). For example, “Imagine that you are getting ready to go to a new ATTACHMENT STYLES 3 school and you are a little bit worried. Who would you most want to talk to about how you feel about going to this new school?” (2009, pg. 355). The questions were divided up in to questions dealing with attachment, companionship, and emotion-eliciting situations at school (Siebert and Kerns, 2009)....
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This note was uploaded on 09/12/2011 for the course HDFS 3113 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Oklahoma State.

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COCHRANE - Running Head: ATTACHMENT STYLES 1 Attachment...

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