HDFS 3424 Fall 2011 Sample Integration Paper

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Running head: MONITORING AND DISCIPLINE 1 Association between Monitoring and Parental Discipline Michael M. Criss Oklahoma State University
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MONITORING AND DISCIPLINE 2 Association between Monitoring and Parental Discipline The purpose of this paper is to review and integrate the findings from four empirical articles that explored the link between monitoring and parental discipline. Monitoring has been defined as parental knowledge of or the tracking of children’s and adolescents’ daily activities (Dishion & McMahon, 1998). This would include child activities such as free time after school or on the weekends, hanging out with friends, and performance in school. Parental discipline refers to the parenting strategies and styles that parents use to socialize their children (Grusec & Goodnow, 1994). In this paper, discipline reflects parenting practices (e.g., psychological control) and aspects of the parent-child relationship (e.g., openness). It was expected that monitoring would be positively related to effective and responsive discipline strategies and negatively related to harsh and coercive socialization efforts. Criss, Shaw, and Ingoldsby (2003) studied the link between positive synchrony and antisocial behavior in middle childhood. The sample consisted of 122 families with 10-year-old sons (48% European American, 43.1% African American, 8.9% other; 54.8% single parent families; M yearly family income = $25,851). Parental monitoring was based on mother reports. Parent-child openness, parent-child conflict, and harsh discipline were assessed using mother and son reports. Positive synchrony was created using observer ratings. The findings indicated that high levels of parental monitoring were significantly related to high levels of positive synchrony and openness (only mother reports) and low levels of conflict and harsh discipline (only mother reports). Parental monitoring was unrelated to child reports of parent-child openness and harsh discipline. Strengths of the study include the use of multiple methods and informants to assess the main constructs. Limitations of the study were the use of cross-sectional data, which limited
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MONITORING AND DISCIPLINE 3 the ability to determine the directionality of the association between monitoring and parental discipline. Also, parental monitoring was based only on mother ratings. In a cross-sectional study by Vazsonyi and Flannery (1997), the authors investigated
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2011 for the course HDFS 3423 taught by Professor Criss during the Fall '08 term at Oklahoma State.

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