{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Chem. Chapter 3 & 4 Outline

Chem. Chapter 3 & 4 Outline - Chapter 3.1 Outline I...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 3.1 Outline I. Chemical Equations A. Chemical reactions are represented in a concise way by chemical equations B. Because atoms are neither created nor destroyed in any reaction, a chemical equation must have an equal number of atoms of each element on each side of the arrow II. Balancing Equations A. Once we know the formulas of the reactants and products in a reaction, we can write the unbalanced equation. B. In balancing equations, it is important to understand the differences between a coefficient in front of a formula and a subscript in a formula C. It is usually best to balance first those elements that occur in the fewest chemical formulas on each side of the equation III. Indicating the States of Reactants and Products A. Additional information is often added to the formulas in balanced equations to indicate the physical state of each reactant and product B. Sometimes the conditions (such as temperature or pressure) under which the reaction proceeds appear above or below the reaction arrow
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 3.2 Outline I. Some Simple Patterns of Chemical Reactivity A. The key to predicting the products formed by a given combination of reactants is recognized II. Combination and Decomposition of Reactions A. In combination reactions two or more substances react to form one product B. When the combination reaction occurs between a metal and a nonmetal, the product is an ionic solid C. In a decomposition reaction one substance undergoes a reaction to produce two or more other substances III. Combustion in Air A. Combustion reacts are rapid reactions that produce a flame B. Combustion of oxygen-containing derivatives of hydrocarbons, such as CH 3 OH, also produces CO 2 and H 2 O C. In our bodies, however, the reactions take place in a series of steps that occurs in body temperature
Image of page 2
Chapter 3.3 Outline I. Formula Weights A. Chemical formulas and chemical equations both have a quantitative significance; the subscripts in formulas and the coefficients in equations represent precise quantities II. Formula and Molecular Weights A. The formula weight of a substance is the sum of the atomic weights of each atom in its chemical formula B. If the chemical formula is that of a molecule, and then the formula weight is also called the molecular weight III. Percentage Composition from formulas A. Occasionally we must calculate the percentage composition of a compound (that is, that percentage by mass contributed by each element in the substance)
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 3.4 Outline I. Avogadro’s Number and the Mole A. Even the smallest samples that we deal with in the laboratory contain enormous numbers of atoms, ions, or molecules B. In everyday life we use counting units like dozen and gross to deal with modestly large quantities C. Avogadro’s number is so large that it is difficult to imagine II. Molar Mass A. A dozen is the same number whether we have a dozen eggs or a dozen elephants B. For other kinds of substances, the same numerical relationship exists between the formula weight (in amu) and the mass (in grams) of one
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern